Fluctuating Weight

All of my life I’ve had fluctuating weight. It is not unusual for me to gain, lose, and then regain twenty pounds, or more, every year. Because of this, I keep at least three different sizes of clothing at hand. When people give the advice “if you haven’t worn it in six months, get rid of it” I ignore them. Most of my clothes are “classic” style that never go out of style. I could not afford to keep buying new clothes every year when my size changes!

When I lived in New England, my weight gain often coincided with winter, and I called it my “winter weight.” That really did not seem to be related to what I ate, or what activities I participated in. My doctor always seemed to be fine with my weight, whatever it was. Interestingly enough, for about the past twenty years, I have been “borderline diabetic” which means that my A1C count was “almost” at the diabetic level. The doctor always had someone from staff call me with the blood test results, and counsel me on what foods to eat, what foods to avoid, and counsel weight loss. Even when my weight was below the accepted normal weight for a woman my age and height!

Healthy weight (free clip art)
Healthy weight (free clip art)

What has been frustrating is that I have always eaten the “right foods” and avoided the “bad foods” and it makes no difference in my A1C levels. I would have to say that my weight fluctuations have been related to medications that I have been on, and related to stress levels. Sometimes I stress-eat. Sometimes I stress-fast. Whatever. No matter what my weight has been, since I started having children, my doctor has never told me to my face (and the official guidelines for healthy weight for a woman my age always say I am within the normal range) that I need to change my weight. The last time my doctor was concerned was when I was pregnant, and he told me I was gaining too much weight too fast. So I stopped eating a donut for a between breakfast and lunch snack, and switched to yogurt. Problem solved.

One of the interesting things about getting together with extended family for holiday celebrations, is how many of the family members feel that they need to comment on my weight. Most of them are critical of my weight, no matter what weight I am at the time. That makes family gatherings very interesting for me. Knowing that my family cares is fine, but it is hard to keep from feeling defensive all of the time about my weight when my doctor keeps telling me that I am fine (except for being borderline diabetic, which seems to simply be a forever state of being for me!)

Careers in Healthcare

Somewhere around 1998, when I retired from the telephone company, I attended a job fair/seminar/conference that was being held by the local college that I attended. There was a schedule of “sessions” that were being run in different rooms in the building, and one of the sessions that I attended was about the future of the employment market in the United States of America. The person doing the presentation indicated that we were moving away from an manufacturing employment market, due to the large corporations shifting their manufacturing work overseas, and were moving towards a “service industry.”

The “service industry” that the presenter was encouraging people to pursue was the healthcare industry. The aging Baby-Boom generation is going to need a lot of health care! We are living longer than ever, and the geriatric population definitely needs a lot of health related help!

There is a shortage of nurses in the United States of America – and many of our healthcare facilities is using nurses that are from other countries that are here short-term. If I was a younger person, just getting out of high school, and looking for a career with a stable future, I would definitely consider entering the Maryville University’s Nursing Program and going into a nursing career.

First Aid in the Home

First Aid at home
First Aid at home

Why did the blonde move house?

Because she heard that most accidents happen within three miles of your house.

Sadly, it’s true – most personal accidents do happen within three miles of your own home, if not inside the walls themselves. Please excuse the blonde joke.

Our homes are where we spend the majority of our time, so it seems only logical that’s where the accidents and incidents happen – are you prepared if something happens to you, or your loved ones?

If you aren’t, something happens and you’re in need of a second opinion on a case you’ve found yourself in – try the people over at SOS Claims, it’s their job to reassure you and set your mind at ease.

To keep you safest in your home, it’s best to have a basic knowledge of first aid and medical know-how.

Pills, pills, pills.

If you keep paracetamol, ibuprofen or any other pills in your house make sure that you keep them out of sunlight and away from any perishables. Also – keep them in the blister-pack until you need them – the air reacts with the outside and this can make them ineffective and dangerous, depending on their shelf-life.

Medicine Cabinet.

I’m not suggesting you go out and rack up a million Boots points on stocking up your medicine cabinet, but I would suggest keeping the basics stocked up. Make it personal; if you’re an avid baker or general chef – make sure you’ve got a burns kit, if you’ve got children – keep children’s aspirin or Calpol handy.

Cuts, Scrapes, Slashes.

Cutting yourself is one of the most common accidents within the home. If you have cut yourself badly; apply pressure with anything that’s clean and absorbent. Raise, if you can, the limb above your heart – if this means sitting down and putting your legs up then do it. Use your judgement, if you’ve ever been cut this badly before, think about what you need – if not, analyse the situation and ask someone for help. If needed they can drive you to a hospital for stitches. In terms of cuts, I would say it’s better to be safe than sorry – go to the hospital and have them take a look at it for you, it’ll be their call if stitches/glue or further repairs are needed.

Head Injuries.

I feel we are all reasonably good at assessing our own head injuries particularly well. Only you will know how hard you hit your head, if you’ve hit your head like that before and how much it hurts. If you are worried – sit down, have a glass of water. If needs be, work through this handy easy-to-remember guide. (The 5 S’s)

  • Sleep
  • If you feel faint or like you’re losing consciousness – call someone, or ask someone to call you an ambulance.

  • Seizures

If you’re suffering from seizures an ambulance is non-negotiable.

  • Speaking

If you’re having trouble speaking, try and calm down. Breathe and try again. If this doesn’t seem to help, call help.

  • Senses

If your vision is blurred, speech slurred or you experience loss of hearing, call help.

  • Sick

Vomiting is a common sign of concussion, but don’t panic. Just call for help.

Health Information Technology Trends

One of the more interesting things about the changing employment market is that as more physically intensive jobs are taken over by machines, more jobs open up that are related to handling information. Here in the United States, we are looking at the end of the industrial age and moving into the information age.

One occupational field that will likely stand the test of time and the transition is healthcare. As people are looking for new types of careers that combine healthcare with the information age, taking courses at the University of Illinois at Chicago may help pave the way to a new career in Health Information Technology. Career advisers are apt to encourage their clients to try to find work in a field that supports the information age. The following infographic addresses careers in Health Information Technology.

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