Understanding Brain Injuries

Boy With Trauma Of The Head
Boy With Trauma Of The Head

When we talk about brain injuries, the subject is nearly always confused because of the sheer number of things that can cause an injury to the brain. There are two main ways in which brain injuries can be classified – and myriad ‘sub-genres’ within those.

  • non-acquired brain injury
  • acquired brain injury

It is easier to explain an acquired brain injury.

Acquired brain injuries (ABIs) are those caused by events that occur after birth. Within this are traumatic brain injuries (TBIs), and many other causes.

A non-acquired brain injury is one that is either genetic or congenital, such as foetal alcohol syndrome, or an ante-natal illness. It may be a progressive condition, such as Huntington’s disease, or Parkinson’s disease.

Causes of ABI

Leaving aside traumatic brain injuries, there are a number of other causes of an acquired brain injury.

  • abscess
  • anoxiabrain tumours
  • CO poisoning
  • encephalitis
  • hydrocephalus
  • hyponatraemia
  • meningitis
  • strokes

What is anoxia?

Anoxia means a complete reduction in blood oxygen levels, and is more commonly known as hypoxia – a general or local reduction in oxygen supply. Hypoxia can be incredibly dangerous, as aside from the various damages that can occur to parts of the body, prolonged cerebral hypoxia can cause long-term brain damage.

Causes of hypoxia include near drowning, electric shock, drug overdose, organ failure, industrial or chemical exposure, injury secondary to a TBI or CVA.

What is CVA?

A cerebrovascular accident, or a stroke, is the name given to an event leading to cell death in the brain caused through ischemia, or haemorrhage.

An ischemic CVA means that there is a lack of blood flow, which could be due to one of the following:

  • Thrombosis: a localised blood clot
  • Embolism: an intravascular mass (either a blood clot, or another obstruction) which has travelled
  • Systemic Hypoperfusion: decreased blood supply
  • Venous thrombosis: a specific blood clot which forms in the Dural venous sinuses – the vein channels that lie between layers of Dura Mater – and can drain the blood from the brain.

A haemorrhagic CVA means that there is bleeding in the brain. Either an intracranial haemorrhage – bleeding that occurs between layers of Mater and/or the skull. Or a cerebral haemorrhage – bleeding that occurs within the brain tissue.

The effects of ABI

The effects of an ABI will range from person to person depending on a number of factors: speed and efficacy of medical treatment; overall health of person; reliability of aftercare; underlying conditions or previous head injuries; and luck.

Brain injuries can affect your personality or your behaviour, both short-term and long-term. You could be left with cognitive problems, such as memory loss, or aphasia. Brain injuries can also affect you physically, perhaps through nerve damage, or even leaving you with a condition like epilepsy.

If you have suffered a brain injury, and you wish to seek legal advice as to whether you have a personal injury or negligence claim, the resources at the Free Legal Advice Centre could be just what you’re looking for.

Missed Very Important Deadline

Watching a gardening YouTube video, I was quite aggravated to learn this morning that I had missed a very important deadline for planting this most wonderful crop! I will have to mark my calendar for next year to plant it next year on time! Watch this video, and you may decide to try to plant this crop next year, too!

After all, my many Facebook Friends insist that chocolate is a vegetable, so this makes perfect sense, right?

Mobile Payments and Banking Are Really Convenient

I just got a new iPhone 6 a couple of weeks ago! I resisted getting an iPhone for a very long time, as I loved my Blackberry Torch 9800 that I got several years ago. I loved the tactile, sliding keyboard, and I am uncomfortable with the keyboards that are part of the screen. I don’t want to use a stylus, and my fingers are clumsy when I try to type the keys I often hit the wrong keys!

But I have to admit that I am enjoying the convenience of the Wells Fargo app that lets me deposit checks online. I’ve also started to use the Wal-Mart Savings Catcher app with my iPhone – that is really convenient! I’m starting to learn more about Mobile Payments and Banking, and have learned a great deal from this infographic that I found on the website by Ohio University Online. I thought that maybe if I put it here on my blog, I could reference it easily in the future, and maybe someone else might read it and learn something too!

Which adhesive to use?

Top of shirt
Top of shirt

Recently I ordered a pretty shirt online from Amazon. The bodice of the shirt is covered with embellishments consisting of small shiny discs that I would guess are plastic. When I took the shirt out of the plastic bag it arrived in, many of the little discs fell off of the shirt. Some stayed in the bag, some came out of the bag and dropped all over the floor. Where the little discs used to be on the shirt, are little round dots of the adhesive that failed to hold the discs on. (Photo above of the shirt.)

I complained to the merchant at Amazon, and they are going to send me a replacement (if they can find one that doesn’t shed the embellishments) or a refund. So I expect that will be resolved. However, I am tempted to try to re-glue those little discs to the shirt. My question to you, folks, is, what would you suggest I use to remove the bad dots of glue from the shirt, and what EXACT brand and name of adhesive would you use to try to re-attach these little guys? I have no experience in this, but I’m thinking Arlene’s Fabric Fusion. I’d love to hear your thoughts on this, if you have had good luck with an adhesive product in a situation like this!

(Photo below of loose discs that fell off shirt)

loose embellishments that fell off shirt while still in package
loose embellishments that fell off shirt while still in package

Thankful For a Mild Snowstorm but Aggravated at Doctor Office

The weatherman was predicting a huge snowstorm to come bearing down on our house last night. The snow started in the afternoon, but it seemed to be a lighter storm than predicted. The weatherman was predicting 8 – 12 inches. After all was said and done, we only got three inches. I am grateful for the smaller amount. To be honest, I was worried that we would lose our electricity, and even though we can survive a few days without it, we have been spoiled by our easy access to electronic entertainment!

Thinking we would lose our electricity while sleeping, we cranked the heat up, so the house would stay warmer longer, and we put several large buckets in the bathtubs and filled them with water for flushing needs. Better to be prepared and not need it than the other way around!

This morning I was scheduled to have a medical appointment for injections to treat my migraines in DC at 11am. It takes about two hours to get there from where I live. Seeing that almost every business and government and school in DC (and surrounding areas) was cancelled, Metro being shut down, and a state of emergency declared, it would be reasonable to assume that the doctor’s office would not be open. In order to get to my appointment, I need to leave by 9am – if the roads are good. About 8:30 I started trying to contact the doctor’s office to find out if they are open and seeing patients. At first I got the automated message telling me to leave a message and they would call me back in 48 hours. That was not going to do the trick, so I called back and hit a different option. Same thing. Third call, I finally got a live person who assured me that they were, in fact, open. I indicated that I would like to reschedule my appointment for later in the day if that was possible, asking if they had any cancellations I could take. The lady got rather nasty with me and told me that if my appointment was for 11, then I had better by there by 11! She then told me to hold on while she checked for cancellations. After being on “hold” for about five minutes, I was disconnected. So I called back again, explained again what I needed, and put on hold again for about five minutes. Then someone else came on the line and told me that the doctor had called in and said that she was not coming in to work today because of the weather and bad roads, that they would call me in 48 hours to reschedule my appointment for another day.

On the one hand, I was grateful that I did not have to make the trip – the roads are probably slippery and with a ban on street parking in DC because of the snow, it would probably have been a real nightmare going in! However, I did not appreciate the less than stellar customer service I was given by the folks at the doctor’s office when I was trying to figure out if I had to hit the road to go in and brave the bad roads, only to find out after about thirty minutes of aggravation that the doctor had called in to say that all appointments needed to be rescheduled!